Dog Mountain bike trails, inWashington in the Gifford Pinchot Forest. With extreme cycling spots, downhill paths and single track bike riding.
Bike Trails

Trail Stats for Dog Mountain
Official homepage: USDA Forest Service

Location: Nine miles east of Stevenson
Season:
March - December
Elevation:
High: 2,800 feet, Low: 150 feet
Vertical Drop:
2,650 feet
Number of Trails:
Length:
6 miles or 9.7 km's
Terrain: Beginner, Intermediate, Some Advanced
Type: Downhill, Cross-Country
Phone Number: (360) 891-5000
Description: The eastern fork climbs 2,000 feet in elevation in 2.5 miles to the site of a former fire lookout. A 1-mile loop trail to the summit provides easy access through flowered hillsides and offers an incredible view of the western portion of the Columbia River Gorge You can also get superb views along the eastern fork of the trail, without having to climb all the way to the summit.
  
The northern route climbs steeply for 2.5 miles through a dense forest to the lookout site. The trail intersects the loop trail to the summit of Dog Mountain.
Directions: Take I-84 eastbound approximately 40 miles to Cascade Locks. Take exit 44, and cross the Bridge of the Gods to the Washington side of the river. Remember that the toll to cross the bridge is $1.00 per car each way. After crossing the bridge, turn right on SR-14 for 12 miles. Between mileposts 53 and 54, there will be a sign on the left side of the road reading "Dog Mountain Trailhead", set in a large turnout area. Just look for lots of cars, and you'll find it easily. Make sure you have a Northwest Forest Pass to park at the trailhead.

You can help out by updating, adding information, making corrections, or sending pictures.
Submissions for mountain biking trails

<< Pictures >>
Backside Of The Mountain
Single Track
 
 
Technical Climb To The Summit
 
 
<< Maps>>
Street Map
Topographical
   
  *These Google maps open in a new window.
  1. Recommend your favorite place
    (Remember to tell us where and why)
  1. Recommend your favorite place
    (Remember to tell us where and why)

   

 

© SPOON Media 2005